Parenting Resources

Being a parent is hard right now. You know your family best so do what works for your family.

Parenting During COVID-19

Being a parent is hard right now.  Your children may be at home or might be going to school some or all of the time.  You might be working or you might be at home.  You might have embraced home schooling or decided that spending time together doing things you enjoy is more important.  You know your family best so do what works for your family.

Top Tips

There are some things you can do which might be helpful.

  • Having a routine even if that is different from normal is important.  Waking up, eating and going to bed at the same time every day will help.  Having a balance of activities is also important.
  • Talking about why things are changing in an age appropriate way can help children to understand and make sense of what is going on.  You can find Resources for Talking to You Child about COVID-19 here.
  • Developing and supporting healthy routines is also important.  Sleeping well, eating well and taking regular exercise will help you and your family to stay well.
  • Looking after your own health (both physical and mental) will help you to support your family.  You can find Self Care Resources for Adults here. 

Children and young people cope with stress in different ways.  Here is some information from the World Health Organisation about how to support their wellbeing during these stressful times.

 

Advice from Speech and Language Therapy for Parents and Guardians

Coronavirus has changed all our lives at the moment. The speech and language therapy team are aware that life is a bit different and more stressful than usual.

Calm communication with children is important all the time, but even more so now. To give you some support, the speech and language therapy team would like to encourage all families to follow some simple but effective advice. This can really help to keep children calm and secure by using a positive communication style.

Firstly, it really helps if all children have:

  • A structure so they know what’s going to happen each day.
  • Help to make sense of all the changes to their usual routine.
  • A calm and reassuring adult to tell their thoughts and feelings to.

The next thing to think about is the style of communication and the words you use. Using calm words and watching how you say them will make a big difference. This will help to stop children getting angry, overwhelmed or acting out.

  • Tone of voice is really important. Keep a calm tone of voice even if you don’t feel calm inside. This is especially important when your child is upset or distressed.
  • Positive words are a good way to help. Focus on telling your child what you want them to do; try not to tell them what they shouldn’t be doing. This is the very best way to help with their emotions. Try to avoid words like “no” and “don’t”. Negative words don’t usually help to calm things down or give reassurance. Use positive words instead. Calmly saying “yes later” or suggesting an alternative is much less likely to trigger a reaction. A good example of using positive words is, rather than saying “stop jumping on the couch”, you can say “start playing with your figures now”.
  • Using few words is better than too many words when you want to keep things calm. Too many words can be a trigger or make children more stressed.

Remember, Use calm words and watch how you say them.

Parent Club offers up-to-date guidance from the Scottish Government on your child’s health and education. It’s full of hints and tips from other parents and carers who’ve been there before. It also has advice to help you look after your own wellbeing and to point you in the direction of the support available.

Free online parenting course provided by Scottish Government

While we know you may be under different pressures right now, you might be interested in looking at this free online parenting course for parents and carers of children aged 0 to 19. The course aims to help parents and carers understand their child’s development, support them emotionally and improve their relationship. For more details and to sign up visit Ourplace and use the code ‘tartan’ to gain free access.

 

Returning to School

Royal College of Occupational Therapists (RCOT)

The Royal College of Occupational Therapists (RCOT) have produced a document called 'Preparing Your Child for Returning to School' to support you in helping your child/young person to return to school.

You can also find resources at the following

Here are resource packs focusing on supporting a return to school. These were written by the NES Early Intervention TIPS Clinicians in NHS Grampian.

 

      

 

Learning at home - keeping your child happy and healthy while learning at home

Fife Council and Fife Health and Social Care Partnership therapy services have worked together on the ‘Learning at home resource’ keeping your child happy and healthy while learning at home.' The resource supports readiness for remote learning, aiming to maximise learning potential, increase fun and reduce the stress of learning at home.

For more information

Mindfulness: A Focus on Adolescents

Free Online Course developed by The University of Glasgow

 

Mindfulness: A Focus on Adolescents - get a hands-on introduction to mindfulness and its benefits.

 

What topics will you cover?

  • The application and evidence base for mindfulness in education settings
  • Case studies of young people who have used mindfulness, and how it helped them
  • Basic introduction to simple mindfulness techniques
  • The role of mindfulness in helping with anxiety, focus, exam stress, compassion and improving wellbeing

 

Who is the course for?

This course is for all professionals interested in mindfulness, including healthcare professionals, educators, parents and anyone looking to enhance their understanding of mindfulness.