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CORONAVIRUS (COVID-19)

*UPDATED* Hospital visiting changes, home testing kits, Vaccine info, general info and guidance for public, NHSGGC staff, and community-based services.

About the COVID vaccines

No. Neither the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine nor the AstraZeneca (AZ) vaccine are live vaccines. The AZ vaccine uses an a...

No. Neither the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine nor the AstraZeneca (AZ) vaccine are live vaccines.

The AZ vaccine uses an adenovirus, but as it cannot replicate it is not a live vaccine.

You will be given an injection in your upper arm.   You will need two doses, the second will be offered 10-12 weeks ...

You will be given an injection in your upper arm.  

You will need two doses, the second will be offered 10-12 weeks after the first dose. During your vaccination, strict infection prevention and control measures will be in place.

The schedule requires two doses. Current guidance does not recommend booster doses beyond the initial two doses.  Th...

The schedule requires two doses.

Current guidance does not recommend booster doses beyond the initial two doses.  This may change as we understand more about the effect of the vaccine

If an interval longer than the recommended interval is left between doses, the second dose should still be given (preferably using the same vaccine as was given for the first dose if possible). The course does not need to be restarted.

We are inviting people back between 8 and 12 weeks but if someone is unable to attend their appointment and is vaccin...

We are inviting people back between 8 and 12 weeks but if someone is unable to attend their appointment and is vaccinated beyond 12 weeks, there is no detriment to them.

Local reactions can be common after vaccination. Most commonly this could be discomfort at the injection site, usual...

Local reactions can be common after vaccination.

Most commonly this could be discomfort at the injection site, usually without redness and swelling. Generally symptoms might include fatigue or a headache, but are mild and short lived.

Mild fever following COVID-19 vaccination is a common. However, this is an expected reaction and isolation is not required unless COVID-19 is suspected.

You will be given a leaflet about what to expect when you attend a vaccination clinic.

Not necessarily, but mild side effects are quite common.

Not necessarily, but mild side effects are quite common.

For both vaccines, efficacy is very high after first dose (greater than 70%). The second dose is still important to ...

For both vaccines, efficacy is very high after first dose (greater than 70%).

The second dose is still important to provide longer lasting protection and is expected to be as or more effective when delivered 12 weeks after the first dose.

More detailed information from the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) can be accessed on the UK Government website.

You should not get the Pzifer coronavirus vaccine if you've had a severe anaphylactic reaction to any of the ingredie...

You should not get the Pzifer coronavirus vaccine if you've had a severe anaphylactic reaction to any of the ingredients in the vaccine or a previous dose of the vaccine. 

Before you're vaccinated, tell the person giving you the vaccine if you've ever had a serious allergic reaction (anaphylaxis).

This will affect very few people, but you will be able to ask any questions at your appointment. If you are unable to take the Pfizer vaccine for this reason you will be have to make a separate appointment for an alternative vaccine.

This is not yet known and will be the subject of further study.

This is not yet known and will be the subject of further study.

The Pzifer vaccine trial took place in the United States, Germany, Turkey, South Africa, Brazil and Argentina. The As...

The Pzifer vaccine trial took place in the United States, Germany, Turkey, South Africa, Brazil and Argentina. The AstraZeneca vaccine trials took place in the UK, South Africa and Brazil.

The vaccine helps to build up your immunity to the virus, so your body will fight it off more easily if it affects you.

The vaccine helps to build up your immunity to the virus, so your body will fight it off more easily if it affects you.

Yes, both vaccines are safe. The vaccines have been through the Medicines & Healthcare products Regulatory Agency...

Yes, both vaccines are safe. The vaccines have been through the Medicines & Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) approval process. Clinical trials have shown both vaccines to have no serious adverse events.

Long term side effects are not anticipated. As with any new medical product a yellow card notification (https://yello...

Long term side effects are not anticipated. As with any new medical product a yellow card notification (https://yellowcard.mhra.gov.uk/) should be completed if any side effects are experienced. This will help monitor for any unexpected side effects.

A monitoring programme has been set up by the MHRA to monitor for any unexpected side effects.

The vaccine should reach full effect at 7 days following the second dose. Both the Pfizer and AstraZeneca vaccines ar...

The vaccine should reach full effect at 7 days following the second dose. Both the Pfizer and AstraZeneca vaccines are estimated to be between 90-95% effective after both doses have been administered.

Yes. Unless you have a condition which means that taking them is not advised.

Yes. Unless you have a condition which means that taking them is not advised.

Most symptoms from the vaccine are mild.  The most common events are likely to be injection site pain, fatigue, and h...

Most symptoms from the vaccine are mild.  The most common events are likely to be injection site pain, fatigue, and headache. The vaccine may cause a mild fever which usually resolves within 48 hours. This is a common, expected reaction and isolation is not required unless there are epidemiological or other clinical reasons to suspect COVID-19 infection

 If you have a fever you can take paracetamol.  

Severe reactions are extremely rare. If you develop symptoms of a severe reaction you should call 999.

No. Neither vaccine is a live vaccine, therefore you cannot develop COVID-19 from it or pass it on to anyone else. 

No. Neither vaccine is a live vaccine, therefore you cannot develop COVID-19 from it or pass it on to anyone else. 

There is no need for antibody tests. The clinical trials performed have proven that both vaccines work. No vaccine is...

There is no need for antibody tests. The clinical trials performed have proven that both vaccines work. No vaccine is 100% effective so there is still a risk of getting COVID-19 even if you have the vaccine but the risk is greatly reduced.

No. Even if you have had the vaccine, at present the required infection control precautions do not change.

No. Even if you have had the vaccine, at present the required infection control precautions do not change.

The vaccine greatly reduces the risk of COVID-19 but no vaccine is 100% effective so there is still a small risk of g...

The vaccine greatly reduces the risk of COVID-19 but no vaccine is 100% effective so there is still a small risk of getting COVID.

Not currently.  Trials are underway in children under 16.

Not currently.  Trials are underway in children under 16.

If you have a minor illness without fever or systemic upset (such as headache, stomach upset or dizziness), you may s...

If you have a minor illness without fever or systemic upset (such as headache, stomach upset or dizziness), you may still receive your vaccination.

If you have symptoms consistent with COVID-19 (see NHS inform website) then you should isolate and arrange testing and not attend for vaccination.

 If you have a more severe illness, then immunisation should be postponed until after recovery. This is to avoid wrongly attributing any symptoms to the vaccine.

You need to wait at least 7 days.

You need to wait at least 7 days.

Yes you should have the vaccine. The types of vaccines being used do not pose any increased risk to those who are imm...

Yes you should have the vaccine. The types of vaccines being used do not pose any increased risk to those who are immunosuppressed.

The vaccine may be less effective in those with immunosuppression and so it is important to follow any guidance you have been given around increased precautions against COVID-19.

Yes, unless you have deteriorating symptoms.

Yes, unless you have deteriorating symptoms.

No. If you have been identified as a close contact or have been told to self-isolate then you should not be attending...

No. If you have been identified as a close contact or have been told to self-isolate then you should not be attending for vaccination and should defer your appointment until after this period.

Yes. There is no evidence of any safety concerns from vaccinating individuals with a past history of COVID-19 infecti...

Yes. There is no evidence of any safety concerns from vaccinating individuals with a past history of COVID-19 infection or with detectable antibodies. 

There are clinical trials being undertaken to determine if past infection protects against further infection.

Your vaccination should be deferred until at least four weeks after the onset of your symptoms.

Your vaccination should be deferred until at least four weeks after the onset of your symptoms.

Last Updated: 15 February 2021