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COVID-19 (Coronavirus info)

Information and guidance for public, NHSGGC staff, and community-based services.  Hospital visiting restrictions now in place.

PPE

PPE is worn to protect you from contamination with viral particles to reduce the risk of passing the virus between residents and staff. Along with handwashing, it provides additional protection against infection in situations in which social distancing cannot be maintained. 

  • Before each interaction with residents in which you can’t maintain social distancing, you should assess any likely exposure and ensure PPE is worn that provides adequate protection against the risks associated with the procedure  
  • You must be trained in the proper use of all PPE that you may be required to wear 
  • Staff who may have had and recovered from COVID-19 should still follow infection control precautions, including wearing all recommended PPE   

Detailed guidance on the PPE requirements in care homes in found in the national PPE guidance  and in COVID-19: Information and Guidance for Care Home Settings. 

Gloves, which should fit neatly over back of hand and around wrist  Apron with bare forearms  Type 2 fluid resist...

  • Gloves, which should fit neatly over back of hand and around wrist 
  • Apron with bare forearms 
  • Type 2 fluid resistant surgical masks (FRSM) should also be worn if any of the residents in the care home is a suspected or confirmed COVID-19 case, not only when providing care for that resident but for all residents. If none of the residents is a suspected or confirmed case then a risk assessment should be performed to decide whether or not to use a mask. 

NB. Care Homes Guidance: A PPE statement was issued by the Scottish Government with COSLA and SJC Unions and states that social and home workers can wear a fluid resistant surgical mask (FRSM) along with other appropriate PPE where the person they are visiting or otherwise attending to is neither confirmed nor suspected of having COVID-19, if they consider doing so is necessary to their own and the individuals safety.

Eye protection (visors or goggles) should also be considered for tasks where there are increased risks of droplet transmission, particularly from residents face to your face, e.g. when providing personal care such as cleaning teeth, shaving or caring for someone who is coughing.

Detailed guidance on the PPE requirements in care homes is found in the national PPE guidance  and in COVID-19: Information and Guidance for Care Home Settings

This NHS Scotland poster shows PPE requirements for:  PPE on low risk (green) pathway PPE on medium risk (amber) ...

This NHS Scotland poster shows PPE requirements for: 

  • PPE on low risk (green) pathway
  • PPE on medium risk (amber) pathway
  • PPE on high risk (red) pathway
  • PPE for unit-wide airborne precautions

This NHS Scotland poster  (pdf) shows this PPE in Social or Community or Residential settings. This NHS Scotland pos...

This NHS Scotland poster  (pdf) shows this PPE in Social or Community or Residential settings.

This NHS Scotland poster  (pdf) shows this PPE in General Areas.

Putting on PPE (Donning) PPE should be put on before entering the room.    The order for putting on is apron, sur...

Putting on PPE (Donning)

PPE should be put on before entering the room.  

  •  The order for putting on is apron, surgical mask, eye protection (where required) 

How do I put on PPE and take it off safely?: Donning

Removal of PPE (Doffing) 

PPE should be removed in an order that minimises the potential for cross-contamination.  

  • Gloves  
  • Apron 
  • Eye Protection  
  • Fluid Resistant Surgical facemask  

To minimise cross-contamination, the order outlined above should be applied  

Perform hand hygiene immediately after removing all PPE 

How do I put on PPE and take it off safely?: Doffing

Gloves and aprons are subject to single use as per Standard Infection Control Procedures (SICPs) with disposal afte...

  • Gloves and aprons are subject to single use as per Standard Infection Control Procedure(SICPs) with disposal after each patient or resident contact 
  • Fluid repellent surgical mask and eye protection can be used in the same way or for a session of work rather than a single patient or resident contact. 
  • Hand hygiene should be practiced and extended to exposed forearms, after removing any element of PPE  

A single session refers to a period of time where a health care worker is undertaking duties in a specific care setting/exposure environment e.g. providing ongoing care for residents. 

A session ends when the health care worker leaves the care setting/exposure environment (eg to go on a break) or when the PPE becomes soiled. There may be multiple sessions in a shift – the two are not the same thing. All PPE must immediately be removed and disposed of at the end of the session (in some cases eye protection can be cleaned and reused. You must not continue to wear PPE beyond the end of the session, including whilst on a break.  

The aprons you wear as a care home worker are plastic, waterproof and are worn with bare forearms.    The aprons a...

  • The aprons you wear as a care home worker are plastic, waterproof and are worn with bare forearms.   
  • The aprons are designed to be thin so they are light and easy to wear and do not restrict your movement.   
  • If the apron tears, you should dispose of the apron as per doffing guidance and renew the apron immediately.   
  • Gowns (long sleeved fluid repellent gowns) are only recommended for aerosol generating procedures. 

Shoe coverings are not required in care home settings.   

Shoe coverings are not required in care home settings.   

If any of the care home residents is a suspected or confirmed COVID-19 case, masks should be routinely used for every...

If any of the care home residents is a suspected or confirmed COVID-19 case, masks should be routinely used for every episode of care and for all residents in the care home. You can also wear a fluid resistant surgical mask (FRSM) when there are no suspected or confirmed cases in the care home, if you consider doing so is necessary to your own and the individual’s safety. However, you should perform a risk assessment to ensure that the use of a mask in that situation is providing you with the optimal level of protection.

Should I have a better mask?

Eye protection may be beneficial in some situations and not in others, and so whether or not to use it should be deci...

Eye protection may be beneficial in some situations and not in others, and so whether or not to use it should be decided on the basis of a risk assessment for each situation.  

Eye protection prevents droplets of fluid that may contain virus from entering your eyes, either directly (for example if an infected person coughs directly into your face) or indirectly (if you touch your eyes when your hands are contaminated with virus particles).  

If neither of those things is likely to happen, then eye protection will not provide any additional protection, but its use may make your work more difficult to do and may make the process of safely removing PPE afterwards more complicated.  

However you should use eye protection if you judge that there is an anticipated/likely risk of contamination with splashes, droplets, blood or body fluids. 

 How do I clean my reusable eye protection effectively?  

  • NHSGGC staff produced this guide to cleaning reusable eye protection  

Staff required to wear reusable eye protection should make themselves aware of the updated information. 

Further information on making risks assessments for the use of PPE can be found in the national PPE guidance . 

 

PPE can be off-putting for residents and this makes communication really challenging. If you are working in an area ...

PPE can be off-putting for residents and this makes communication really challenging.

If you are working in an area where people are suspected or confirmed of having COVID-19 you will be communicating and interacting with people whilst you are wearing full PPE which may include visors, facemasks, gloves and full-length aprons. 

Remember the following: 

  • People may react to PPE; we may react to it ourselves as staff 
  • It might increase distress for someone who is confused 
  • It may evoke an unexpected reaction 
  • Be aware of this and where possible explain your appearance in ways that the person can understand   
  • Be thoughtful and try to minimise any negative reaction 

(insert graphic)

Adapted from NES Key Tips for Communicating with People, Section 3 of  

COMMUNICATING WITH AND SUPPORTING PEOPLE 

 

All Care Homes registered with the Care Inspectorate and have an urgent need for PPE can contact the triage centre ru...

All Care Homes registered with the Care Inspectorate and have an urgent need for PPE can contact the triage centre run by NHS National Services for Scotland (NHS NSS). Please note this helpline is to be used only in cases where there is an urgent supply shortage after "business as usual" routes have been exhausted.  

NHS NSS Triage Centre (8am – 8pm, 7 days a week) 

Tel 0300 303 3020 email [email protected] 

Specific PPE enquiries can be answered by NHSGCC Public Health Protection Unit.  Urgent enquiries Tel 0141 201 4917 ...

Specific PPE enquiries can be answered by NHSGCC Public Health Protection Unit. 

Urgent enquiries Tel 0141 201 4917   

General enquiries email:  [email protected] 

Last Updated: 25 November 2020