This site uses cookies to store information on your computer. I'm fine with this Cookie information
Follow is on Twitter Like us on Facebook Follow us on Instagram
Covid-19 (Coronavirus)

Information and guidance for public, NHSGGC staff, and community-based services.  Hospital visiting restrictions now in place.

A Comprehensive Guide to Attendance Management

PREVENTING ABSENCE

Using metrics

Metrics can help you to recognise good practise and spot areas that you need to improve on.

Make metrics your friend

A metric is a unit of measurement - for example, how many patients are there on the ward at any given time. When there is more than one metric (measure) it allows you to make a comparison. Metrics help you to understand what is going on but it only becomes useful when you do something with it. Key questions to ask are: what impact is this metric having on my staff, or patient care? Do I need to talk to my staff about this metric so I can understand the context of this and the impact this is having? If you have a lot of metrics and you are not clear how to use them effectively or what they are telling you, ask someone who uses them (for instance another manager) and then metrics can become useful to you and your team.
Within NHSGGC managers can access Microstrategy which contains a range of performance data relating to their teams including absence rates, bank usage, ksf/pdp; statutory & mandatory training compliance.

Download the Microstrategy User Request form.

All you need to know in 30 seconds

  • Data is useful in understanding the impact of things like sickness absence on your team.
  • Metrics are used to make raw data easy to understand and highlight key areas for improvement.
  • Metrics allow you to track data and put it into useful formats, such as costing.
  • Metrics allow you to prove the case for health and wellbeing initiatives to the board, target key areas for improvement and highlight hot spots for further support.

All you need to know in detail

Metrics are all about making raw and basic data easy to interpret and understand. They help you recognise good practise and spot areas that you need to improve on. They can be anything from a simple spreadsheet to a really complex set of data and formulae. They are readily available and used regularly by analysts as well as all sorts of managers within the NHS who find them invaluable. Using metrics lets you create simple visual summaries of important information, allowing you to present them clearly and flexibly to people who really need to see it, such as your board.

Metrics enable you to understand what is the current position of your department, but only become useful when you do something with the data you have gathered, such as planning a wellbeing strategy, challenging and informing your management colleagues, and help you map engagement for key stakeholders. Health and wellbeing can be measured using a number of metrics such as:

  • staff sickness absence
  • top five reasons for absence
  • return to work meeting numbers
  • vacancy establishment
  • HR / OH interventions and referrals (explore if available)
  • agency and bank staff usage
  • iMatter response rates
  • appraisal rates
  • statutory mandatory training rates
  • induction rates.

All the above is really useful data, allowing you to target important areas and hot spots for interventions and developments. Key questions to ask are what impact is this metric having on my team, or patient care? Do I need to talk to my team about this metric so I can understand the context of this and the impact this is having?

Last Updated: 07 May 2019