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FAQ's

Did you know

  • Having your vaccination will remove you as source of infection to patients in your care, their family members or carers in attendance and fellow colleagues who may be in a clinical ‘at risk’ category
  • That people are infectious for 2-3 days before showing symptoms
  • You can infect another person within a 6ft distance
  • You can infect another person simply by breathing (via the water vapour from your breath)
  • Ibuprofen, coffee and energy drinks may make you feel well enough to attend work, but you could still be infectious
  • Viruses can ‘survive’ on your hands (for example from rubbing your mouth and nose) and be spread by direct contact or indirect contact via door handles and surfaces
  • Viruses can be spread by sneezing and coughing. The virus is spread in mucus/saliva spray droplets in the air, by direct contact or onto any surface which then becomes a source of infection for patients and colleagues
  • Patients with chronic health conditions, such as respiratory, heart, kidney, liver or neurological conditions. Diabetes, morbid obesity, asplenic or splenic dysfunction. Those who are immunosuppressed due to treatment or conditions, or are pregnant, are all ‘at risk’ from an influenza infection becoming more seriousg. causing viral pneumonia, myocarditis, meningitis, encephalitis or otitis media.

Frequently Asked Questions

Healthcare workers are more likely to be exposed to the flu virus. Every year in Scotland, a number of healthcare wor...

Healthcare workers are more likely to be exposed to the flu virus. Every year in Scotland, a number of healthcare workers get flu, particularly where there are flu outbreaks in care homes and hospitals.

Having the vaccine:

  • Is the best way to help protect yourself against flu this year
  • Reduces the risk of spreading flu to your family, patients and colleagues who could be at risk of catching the virus

Infected healthcare workers can spread their infection to their patients and family even if they've very mild symptoms or have no symptoms at all.

Patients with health conditions are 18 times more likely to die from flu than healthy people. In fact, people with a compromised immune system are over 50 times more likely than a healthy person to die of flu. And people with liver problems are 80 times more likely to die.

Even for healthy people, flu can be serious, making them feel extremely unwell and unable to carry on with everyday activities.

Vaccination prevents healthcare workers passing flu on to, or getting flu from, their patients. It also helps the NHS...

Vaccination prevents healthcare workers passing flu on to, or getting flu from, their patients. It also helps the NHS to keep running effectively during a flu outbreak, when GPs and hospital services are particularly busy.

It’s recommended that anyone who works in health and social care, and is directly involved in patient care, should ha...

It’s recommended that anyone who works in health and social care, and is directly involved in patient care, should have the flu vaccine. This includes, but isn't limited to:

  • Anyone who works in a GP practice, pharmacy, dental surgery or hospital
  • Workers in paediatric wards, cancer centres and intensive care
  • Those working in social care or care homes

Flu circulates every winter and generally peaks in December and January. This means many people get ill around the sa...

Flu circulates every winter and generally peaks in December and January. This means many people get ill around the same time. However, it is impossible to predict how many cases of flu there will be each year or exactly when it will peak.

The flu vaccine will provide protection for you for the upcoming flu season. People eligible for flu vaccination shou...

The flu vaccine will provide protection for you for the upcoming flu season. People eligible for flu vaccination should have the vaccine each year.

In 2019, health care workers will be offered quadrivalent inactive flu vaccine (QIV). Please inform your Peer Vaccina...

In 2019, health care workers will be offered quadrivalent inactive flu vaccine (QIV). Please inform your Peer Vaccinator or staff at the mass vaccination clinics if you are under 18 years of age as this will determine the brand of vaccine you will be given.

Yes, it's fine to have the flu vaccine while you are taking a course of antibiotics, provided you are not ill with a ...

Yes, it's fine to have the flu vaccine while you are taking a course of antibiotics, provided you are not ill with a fever.

It takes between 10 and 14 days for your immune system to respond fully after you've had the flu vaccine.

It takes between 10 and 14 days for your immune system to respond fully after you've had the flu vaccine.

Yes. The viruses that cause flu can change every year, which means the flu (and the vaccine) this winter may be diffe...

Yes. The viruses that cause flu can change every year, which means the flu (and the vaccine) this winter may be different from last winter.

No. The vaccine does not contain any live viruses, so it cannot cause flu. You may get a slight temperature and achin...

No. The vaccine does not contain any live viruses, so it cannot cause flu. You may get a slight temperature and aching muscles for a couple of days afterwards, and your arm may feel a bit sore where you had the injection. Other reactions are rare, and flu vaccines have a good safety record.

In order that your are immunised prior to the seasonal increase in flu virus circulation from mid-December. If you've...

In order that your are immunised prior to the seasonal increase in flu virus circulation from mid-December. If you've missed this time, you can have the flu vaccine later in the winter although it's best to get it earlier.

Yes. You should not have the flu vaccine if you have ever had an allergic reaction to a flu vaccine or one of its ing...

Yes. You should not have the flu vaccine if you have ever had an allergic reaction to a flu vaccine or one of its ingredients. This happens very rarely. You also need to take precautions if you have an egg allergy.

If you are concerned that you may have allergies or have questions about the flu vaccine you must speak with the Nurse or Doctor before agreeing to be vaccinated.

Please indicate if you have experienced an allergic reaction to the flu vaccine or eggs/egg-containing products on the pre-immunisation screening form.

Read more about who should not have the flu vaccine.

Staff, if they wish, can attend a community/high-street pharmacy to get the flu vaccine privately. The cost varies up...

Staff, if they wish, can attend a community/high-street pharmacy to get the flu vaccine privately. The cost varies upwards to £20.

Yes. The vaccine poses no risk to a breastfeeding mother or her baby, or to pregnant women.

Yes. The vaccine poses no risk to a breastfeeding mother or her baby, or to pregnant women.

Yes. In fact it is important to get the flu vaccine if you are pregnant. It is safe to have at any stage of pregnancy...

Yes. In fact it is important to get the flu vaccine if you are pregnant. It is safe to have at any stage of pregnancy, including in the first trimester and right up to the expected due date. It helps protect the mother-to-be and her newborn baby from catching flu.

Please remember to indicate to the Peer Vaccinator or staff at mass vaccination clinics that you are pregnant in your pre-immunisation screening form.

If you are or think you might be pregnant please speak with your midwife for further information.