Standing Frames

GG&C

Benefits of Standing

 

 

 

 

The best defence against body shape changes is movement or change of position.

For some, supportive standing can have many benefits on their health and well-being. 

Click here for more information

 

Using a Standing Frame

Your child should be as symmetrical as possible and well supported in their standing frame. If your child's standing frame needs adjustments there are key areas that are likely to show that alterations are required.

 

Upright or Prone Standers

  • Chest straps - The chest strap should be firmly fastened behind, ensuring that your child's chest is supported on the front pad.
  • Knee cups - Knees should be as straight as possible in the knee cups. If these are at the right height they will help stop the knees from bending.
  • Foot straps – All straps should be comfortably fastened on top of shoes.

 

Supine Standers

  • Chest Strap - The chest strap should be in the middle of the chest and you should be able to slide your hand comfortably in and out. If the chest strap is too low the child maybe leaning forward.
  • Pelvic Strap - The pelvic strap should be in line with your child's hips.
  • Knee Straps - The knee straps should be directly over your child's knees. If the knee straps are too low, your child's knee may bend a little bit and won't be supporting your child enough.
  • Foot Straps – All straps should be comfortably fastened on top of shoes.

If you notice any changes to these areas on your child's standing frame, please don't hesitate to contact your Physiotherapy Department.

For further information on your specific type of standing frame please refer to the manufacturers information, or speak to your Physiotherapist.

The Association of Paediatric Chartered Physiotherapists (APCP)

The Association of Paediatric Chartered Physiotherapists (APCP) have leaflets for Parents using Standing Frames