This site uses cookies to store information on your computer. I'm fine with this Cookie information

International Service

International Service

The award recognises staff who have travelled overseas to provide healthcare to people in a war torn or third world country.

    Mr Mark Devlin and Mr Craig Russell are two of the nicest people you could ever hope to meet. When asked about t...

   

Mr Mark Devlin and Mr Craig Russell are two of the nicest people you could ever hope to meet. When asked about their Chairman’s Award nomination did they talk about the life changing cleft lip or cleft palate procedures they carry out every day, did they talk about the medical advances that allows them to perform, for their patients, life altering operations – NO, these two unassuming men talked about the importance of their team and how they couldn’t do what they do without their immediate and wider teams support. In fact they were going to nominate their team for a Chairman’s Award - but their team beat them to it!

When pressed they confirmed that yes for the last 10 years for Mark and seven years for Craig they have volunteered with the Northern Cleft Foundation, an annual outreach mission in Nagpur, India.

Over an eight day outreach programme 100 operations are carried out by the Northern Cleft Foundation team, with children and families travelling as far as 200km for treatment. As well as providing life changing surgery to patients both these surgeons provide expertise and training to local staff working in the hospital. With trainees from the UK also accompanying them who get the opportunity to work in a whole new set up in another country this is an experience that will impact on them for the rest of their lives.

The standard of care provided in Nagpur is exactly the same as in the UK, all the doctors, anaesthetists, nurses etc are all fully trained to carry out these procedures.

Mark says as soon as his children are old enough they’ll be coming along with him – its important to show young people how people in other countries live and see what deprivation can truly be.

  Edward is a bank auxiliary nurse at the Queen Elizabeth University hospital and spends a lot of his spare time tra...

 

Edward is a bank auxiliary nurse at the Queen Elizabeth University hospital and spends a lot of his spare time travelling to Sierra Leone.

On his first trip he assisted in the rebuilding of the hospital in Makeni, working alongside the charity Re-surge. On his return to Scotland he joined the charity as a volunteer and has been back out to Sierra Leone once when intense work was taking place to rebuild the surgical theatres and another time to assist in rebuilding the hospital library.

Edward has worked so closely with the surgical team in Sierra Leone and also with the nursing staff here in Glasgow, that he has now put himself through an access to medicine course and has an offer to study medicine at Glasgow University this year.

He plans to complete the course and one day return to Sierra Leone as a surgeon!

  Reducing Preventable Blindness in Children, Malawi Over the past 12 years, 60,000 children have had their vision ...

 

Reducing Preventable Blindness in Children, Malawi

Over the past 12 years, 60,000 children have had their vision saved as a direct result of the paediatric ophthalmology team’s (nursing and admin) sustainable improvement programme.

Sponsored by the Scottish Government, this link programme between the Queen Elizabeth Children's Hospital in Blantyre, Malawi and the Royal Hospital for Children, Glasgow is in it's 12th and final year.

Their aim from the beginning was to provide training to doctors, nurses, optometrists and administrators which would initially allow them to practice at an excellent clinical level, and for them to become the trainers of the future.

They have trained two fully qualified paediatric ophthalmologists; over 90 optometrists; 20 nurses and 3 administrators over the course of the programme, all of whom are now in a position to teach others the skills and knowledge they have learnt.

Well over 60,000 children from across the whole of Malawi, have undergone life changing treatment, that they may not otherwise have had access too.

The team (current and past) donate their evening and weekend time, they gift clinical education, share their own personal resources and unfailingly mentor their partner(s) not only at the time of visits, but we have made sure we are available 24/7 to provide advice and guidance as required.

This team just does it all!