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Gold Winners

Gold Winners

The entries for the nominees below impressed the judges, however, it was felt they didn’t fit into any specific category but were still very much worthy of winning.

    The need for spiritual care can arise in many situations during a hospital stay or working day. Modern, full-tim...

   

The need for spiritual care can arise in many situations during a hospital stay or working day. Modern, full-time chaplains in the NHS are there for people of all faiths or none. Everyone, whether religious or not, needs support, especially in times of crisis. Spiritual care is an everyday human interaction done well. It is about care and compassion.

Chaplains provide care as part of Multi Disciplinary Teams, in areas such as bereavement, palliative care, and Care of the Elderly. They work training staff across all areas to cope with and offer support to bereaved families and carers. They train and support volunteer Ward Visitors to provide company and support to patients who might otherwise suffer loneliness and isolation. They can support teams who might have experienced a traumatic or upsetting patient death by arranging time to reflect on what happened and how that impacts on feelings and morale.

But the part of the job that brings them closest to people is when they listen to individuals and help them to affirm their own life stories. This might mean giving a confidential ear to a patient, or an anxious member of staff. It might be sitting with parents of a stillborn child and helping them to navigate the first hours of their bereavement. Rebekah and Ishaku have been involved in arranging events such as memorials for members of staff which allows the hospital ‘family’ to mark its own significant life events and celebrate its members. They have also arranged for a family to use the Sanctuary so that a seriously ill father could be part of his daughter’s wedding celebrations. They are pleased when they encounter patients who have moved from one area to another as they progress and they can catch up and provide continuity in a new situation.

Gold Winner, Jessie McNeil, is as dedicated to her job today as she was when she first became an auxiliary more tha...

Gold Winner, Jessie McNeil, is as dedicated to her job today as she was when she first became an auxiliary more than 20 years ago.

Following a spell in the catering department at Victoria Infirmary, 72 year old Jessie took on the role of auxiliary and she has never looked back.

She is full of compassion and enthusiasm for the job, truly caring for every life she touches.

She knows that even the tiniest of comments from patients can influence their care, their treatment and their outcome.

Our patients’ journey are richer, safer and slicker because of the skills and dedication of our auxiliary workforce. Jessie McNeil represents the very best of this group of staff.

Liam began working in the GRI’s Biochemistry service eight years ago as the department’s first ever Modern Apprenti...

Liam began working in the GRI’s Biochemistry service eight years ago as the department’s first ever Modern Apprentice (MA).

Near the end of his three year MA program, he was appointed to a substantive Medical Laboratory Assistant (MLA) position at the IRH. As a result, Liam travelled by public transport on a daily basis between his home in Falkirk and the hospital for several months before a position became available at the GRI with his former colleagues.

Liam has now completed his BSc and is set to complete his registration portfolio to become a fully qualified Biomedical Scientist; the department’s first MA to do so.

As part of his BSc Liam completed a project which has been approved for submission to the UK’s leading Biomedical Science congress. This is particularly commendable as it is unusual for support workers to have their posters presented.

    The enthusiasm and energy Louise Colquhoun a paid volunteer co-ordinator has, is just bursting out of her. It al...

   

The enthusiasm and energy Louise Colquhoun a paid volunteer co-ordinator has, is just bursting out of her. It almost feels infectious. She was recruited into her job four years ago and is located in North Glasgow.

A great success for Louise is the ‘Tea and a Blether’ sessions. Introduced and ran every 6 weeks. Something that she would like to have on a more regular basis. This is a benefit to patients and families. Louise said “Patients feel they actively participate and their family and friends can engage along with them”.

One of her other attributes is a beautiful singing voice. This she shares with all at her wee gatherings of patients and their families. She can be heard belting out old songs like ‘Paper Roses’. Louise said: “The power of music, especially singing helps to unlock memories and emotions.”

With the help of Dementia champions, Louise introduced ‘Meaningful Activity Boxes’. These boxes contain items that link to fond, past and personal interests. Also included are sensory items. Louise said: “This is something that the elderly with Dementia rely on more and more as their illness progresses”. This has been such a success that it has been rolled out throughout the whole of NHSGGC.