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Volunteers Award

Scotland’s largest health board has been awarded a national award for its commitment to volunteering and volunteers.

NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde (NHSGGC) has won the UK wide Investing in Volunteers Award for its approach to volunteering.

NHSGGC has over 700 volunteers working directly with services in more than 40 different roles both in hospitals and community settings. There are also many more volunteers who work for voluntary organisations but are based on our sites or with our services.

In order to achieve an Investing in Volunteers award organisations have to demonstrate their commitment to volunteering and volunteers.

Part of the assessment is identifying examples of good practice and NHSGGC was particularly highlighted for the range of roles available to volunteers, the way we adapt tasks to suit individual skills and interests, our volunteering policy, role descriptions and handbooks, and our approach to training and induction.

Rosslyn Crocket, Director of Nursing, NHSGGC said: “Winning the Investing in Volunteers Award is a testament to not only the many volunteers involved with our services but also to our staff and how they support volunteers in their roles.

“We recognise that volunteers play a major role in our organisation and their dedication is second to none. They bring a different range of skills to our services and also bring us together with local communities.

“Volunteering can also offer individuals the opportunity to develop new skills leading to employment. We want to do all that we can to support our volunteers and their development of additional skills through volunteering.”

The Investors in Volunteers assessors visited the organisation in February and spoke to over 50 staff and volunteers from across NHSGGC including staff in hospitals, health centres, clinics, and community and mental health. Comments from both staff and volunteers included:

• volunteers add a component to services that staff cannot;
• volunteers connect us to the needs of the community our CHP serves;
• it’s helped me feel useful, that I make a contribution. I’m trying to get back to work and feel there’s more potential for that now;
• I need experience to help me progress at College and the NHS provides this opportunity and gives me practical training and support;
• I’ve learned new things and it’s helped me develop as a person. It’s been good for my mental health issues and I have remained stable since I started volunteering;
• it makes my life worthwhile. I come out feeling happy with myself, that I’ve done a bit of good.