NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde

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Fast Facts - Child Health
Child health

Women up to the age of 40 can opt to have their baby in a Community Midwife Unit.

Post-natal depression affects up to 20% of women.

By 2011 our aim is for one third of all newborn children to be exclusively breastfed at 6-8 weeks.

Evidence shows that the health benefits for babies who are breastfed include a higher IQ for the baby and reduced risks of gastro-enteritis, ear infections, asthma and obesity.

Mums who breast-feed benefit from quicker weight loss and reduced risk of some cancers.

The World Health Organisation recommends that babies are exclusively breastfed until the age of six months, and that breastfeeding continues until the age of two.

Women are three times more likely to stop breastfeeding in the first two weeks if none of their friends breastfeed.

Almost 90% of women with friends who breastfeed their children also plan to breastfeed their own babies. Where women don?t have friends who breastfeed, the percentage drops to 51%.

In Greater Glasgow and Clyde, 95% of all pregnant women take up routine screening for HIV, rubella, Hepatitis B and syphilis.

In Greater Glasgow and Clyde, parents take up newborn bloodspot screening on 96% of newborn babies.

By the age of three, your baby's brain will have completed 95% of its development.

Obesity affects one in six boys and one in seven girls in Scotland.

One in ten children will be affected by asthma at some stage in their childhood.

Cancer is the number one cause of non-accidental death in teenagers in the UK.

Every day, six young people aged between 13 and 24 are diagnosed with cancer.

Teenage pregnancy rates in Scotland are amongst the highest in Western Europe with around 55 in every one thousand under-20s falling pregnant.

Children in Scotland have substantially higher levels of tooth decay than those in other European countries.  In 2005/06, only 54% of Scottish five year olds had no obvious decay.

Smoking when pregnant increases the risk of your baby being premature, underweight and increases the risk of cot death.

If you continue to smoke after birth, your child is more at risk of developing certain cancers, suffering asthma attacks and other breathing difficulties and will be twice as likely to become a smoker themselves.

If you continue to smoke after birth, your child is more at risk of developing certain cancers, suffering asthma attacks and other breathing difficulties and will be twice as likely to become a smoker themselves.

In the UK, it is estimated that around 17,000 under-fives are admitted to hospital because their parents smoke.

Smoking rates among young people in Scotland are the highest in the UK.

At 13, 3% of children are regular smokers.  By the age of 15, this rises to 14%.

At 13, 3% of children are regular smokers.  By the age of 15, this rises to 14%.

Girls in Greater Glasgow and Clyde are significantly more likely to be regular smokers than boys.

Throughout NHSGGC, between 40% and 70% of children aged five have decayed teeth.

Dental caries is the most frequently recorded cause of admission to acute hospitals in our area for children aged 0-15.

In 2006, 36 percent of 15 year olds and 14 percent of 13 year olds drank alcohol in the previous week.

Almost a fifth (18 per cent) of 15 years olds reported being drunk on at least 10 occasions, while 15 per cent of 13 year olds say they have been drunk at least four times.

Of those children who have drank alcohol in the last week, a third (32 per cent) of 13 year olds and half (50 per cent) of 15 year olds reported deliberately trying to get drunk.

One in six of those 15 year olds who had drunk alcohol reported trying drugs and one in seven reported having unprotected sex as a consequence of alcohol consumption.

Almost a quarter (23 per cent) of 15 year olds, and 17 per cent of 13 year olds, who had drunk alcohol, have been in trouble with the police due to drinking alcohol.

A series of audits on the impact of alcohol on Accident and Emergency departments across Scotland found that nearly 650 children - including 15 children under twelve and one as young as eight years old - were treated for alcohol-related health problems during the six-week audit period.

Around a quarter of young people attending A&E for alcohol-related problems had been assaulted.

Fifty-one percent of people think alcohol is the drug which causes most problems in Scottish society, compared with 22 per cent who say heroin and nine per cent who say tobacco.

65,000 Scottish children are estimated to live with a parent whose drinking is problematic.

A quarter of children on the Child Protection Register are estimated to be there due to parental alcohol or drug misuse.

Last year across Greater Glasgow and Clyde some 535 children were placed on the Child Protection Register.

At 31 March 2007 there were 2,593 children on the Scottish Child Protection Register.

At 31 March 2007 49% of all those on local Scottish Child Protection Registers were because of physical neglect, 23% because of physical injury, 18% because of emotional abuse and 9% because of sexual abuse.

Within Glasgow, at any given time, between 250-350 children are identified as being at risk of significant harm.