This site uses cookies to store information on your computer. I'm fine with this Cookie information
Cookie Control

Pressure Sore Resource

Pressure Sore Resource

NEW CAMPAIGN LAUNCHED TO RAISE AWARENESS OF PRESSURE ULCER PREVENTION

A campaign to raise awareness of pressure ulcers (PUs) prevention across NHSGGC has been launched by Board Nurse Director Rosslyn Crocket.

More than 160 staff attended the launch event at the Beardmore in Clydebank and gave their overwhelming support to the zero tolerance approach to what are commonly referred to as ‘bed sores’.

Rosslyn emphasised that preventing pressure ulcers was "everybody’s business". She said the drive was about everyday clinical practice involving all grades and disciplines of staff – everyone doing everything they can to prevent pressure damage to people in our care.

Anne Wilson, Tissue Viability Nurse and Staff Nurse Holly Satchell, presented on the Surface, Skin Inspection, Keep moving, Incontinence, Nutrition (SSKIN) Care Bundle.

The ward at the Royal Alexandra Hospital in Paisley was one of a number which took part in testing and refining the pilot study amongst a high risk patient group.

The aim was to reduce the occurrence of a pressure ulcer and the study concluded that better outcomes are achieved when all of these interventions are implemented together rather than individually.

The aim was to reduce the occurrence of a pressure ulcer and evidence shows that better outcomes are achieved when all of these interventions are implemented together rather than individually. The study on this ward concluded this was the case.

Staff completed a questionnaire at the end of the pilot, and everyone who responded stated that SSKIN helped pick up vulnerable pressure areas and helped them focus on the five elements to prevent pressure ulcers.

Also, by using every section of the bundle, it encouraged attention to detail and establishment of good habits.

Lesley McGovern, Senior Charge Nurse at the Western Infirmary’s Medical Assessment Unit (MAU), and District Nurses Jan Ross and Isabelle McNeish from the North West Sector, also spoke to their own presentations which argued that up-to-date and regular data plays a significant role in preventing and managing the condition, together with strong leadership and commitment.

Annette Bartley, Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) Quality Improvement Advisor, NHS Wales, gave a powerful presentation outlining how the Welsh health service is aiming for zero tolerance of PUs.

In her presentation Annette said that education of staff around risk identification, assessment, communication and implementing an appropriate preventative strategy, were amongst the key factors in their success, and following care bundles.

Prevention begins at the point of admission, with all patients assessed for PU risk, and "At Risk" cards are issued to quickly identify those at increased risk.

Skin is re-assessed every eight hours where necessary, and preventative action is taken to maintain and correct suitable measures, utilising local tissue viability nursing expertise, and every action is documented regularly throughout the day.

This approach is standardised throughout the Welsh health care system, where education also includes talking to patients and their families, and a patient information pack has been produced.

Rosslyn called on staff to learn from the presentations and good practice shared on the day and to take the examples forward to their own clinical areas, stating that the resources are readily available to help them in their daily practice.

Delegates were asked to name key actions they would take from the seminar and their priorities included:

  • Disseminating information about and implementing the new SSKIN Care Bundle
  • Pressure ulcer prevention requires team work and leadership
  • Keep it Simple - simple actions create prevention
  • Documenting risk assessment, and acting on findings

Rosslyn summed up: "I really appreciate the efforts of all staff to ensure the prevention of pressure sores.

"This focus is fundamental to good quality nursing care and it’s the least we can do for our patients and their families."

Whilst we have our specialist Tissue Viability Nurses in post who advise us on wound care it is important to remember Pressure Ulcer Prevention is everybody’s business. This resource is not just for the Tissue Viability service it's about everyday clinical practice involving all grades and disciplines of staff and what you can do to prevent pressure damage to people in our care.