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A 'Warm Bundle' Shortlisted for National Award

Thursday, September 27, 2018

A project, which began in Glasgow’s Queen Elizabeth University Hospital (QEUH) Maternity Unit and Royal Hospital for Children (RHC) has now been adopted by a number of hospital across the UK, has been shortlisted for a second award for its pro-active response to the problem of hypothermia in babies born after 35 weeks gestation. 

The neonatal unit at the RHC set up a team in collaboration with QEUH Maternity Unit to develop a way to improve new-born thermal care and called the project the “Warm Bundle”. 

The team used information and resources to educate staff and parents about how to optimise the thermal environment for babies and use skin-to-skin contact between babies and their parents to maintain a normal body temperature. 

The project has now been shortlisted for the Excellence for Quality Improvement in Maternity, Neonatal and Paediatric Services category in this year’s national Quality Improvement Awards. 

The Quality Improvement Awards celebrate and showcase the fantastic range of quality improvement practice that is been taking place across the length and breadth of Scotland to make services the best they possibly can be for babies, children, young people and their families in all aspects of their lives. 

The ‘Warm Bundle’ project involved cross-departmental teams who worked closely to introduce a range of measures within the ward environment including increasing the temperature in the labour ward, storing baby linen in warming cupboards and warming cots for high risk babies. 

After a three year period, the number of babies admitted into neonatal care with hypothermia was reduced by 58%.

Kevin Hill, Director of Women and Children's Directorate, NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde, said:  “The Warm Bundle has been a successful project, working collaboratively across maternity and neonatal services, showing that optimising the newborn thermal environment and care keeps mothers and babies together, and substantially reduces neonatal referrals and admissions for hypothermia and hypothermia related morbidities.  

“The team involved has achieved a significant change in culture resulting in improved patient and family-centred care and I am delighted that the importance of their approach to newborn care has been shortlisted by the Quality Improvement Awards.” 

ENDS 

Notes to Editors

In March 2018 the project was awarded the first Project of the Year Award from Bliss, the UK’s leading charity for babies born premature or sick. 

For further information either telephone 0141 201 4429 or email [email protected]

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