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The Queen Elizabeth University Hospital's iconic tower will be lit up red to mark World Aids Day.

Tuesday, December 1, 2015

The tower and other NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde (NHSGGC) hospital sites are joining iconic buildings around the world by “Lighting Up RED” to promote the global campaign and to raise awareness of the virus.

The QEUH is already one of the most dramatic buildings on Glasgow’s cityscape, and Billy Hunter, NHSGGC General Manager, Facilities South and Clyde, said: “We are delighted to support this important world wide event and I’d like to pay tribute to the hard work of my staff who have made it possible to turn the ward tower into one of the most stunning buildings on the Glasgow horizon.

“Thanks to them we are able to demonstrate in an extraordinary visual way NHSGGC’s ongoing commitment to raise awareness of this virus.”

Temporary red filters will cover lighting to bathe sections of Glasgow Royal and Gartnavel General Hospitals in a red glow.

And the atrium lighting in the Royal Alexandra Hospital (RAH) will be changed to red.

Special stalls with literature, red ribbons and posters will be set up at Gartnavel General Glasgow Royal, Royal Alexandra and Inverclyde Royal Hospitals, and at the Sandyford Central clinic for family planning, sexual and reproductive health services.

The Brownlee HIV Patients’ Forum will also have a stall inside the QEUH.

Jo Zinger, NHSGGC’s Health Improvement Lead - Sexual Health, added: “We are delighted to be taking part in this campaign to raise awareness about World AIDS Day and highlight the fact that HIV and AIDS has not gone away in Scotland.

“We want people to get involved and think about what role they can play in challenging stigma and reducing new cases of HIV.”

George Valiotis, CEO of HIV Scotland - the national HIV policy charity for Scotland - said:

“We’re delighted that the Queen Elizabeth University Hospital is marking World AIDS Day by joining our ‘Light Up Scotland’ Campaign.

“World AIDS Day is a time to remember those who have died, as well as reflect on the progress that has been made in caring for people with HIV over the past 30 years.

“On average, someone is diagnosed with HIV every day in Scotland. The majority will live long and healthy lives, but each year people with HIV are dying from preventable illnesses.

“By joining the QEUH in our Light Up Scotland project, and by marking World AIDS Day, the community can be more aware of HIV and helps us ensure that people with HIV live longer healthier lives.”

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