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Elderly Patients Benefit from New Sensory Garden

October 28, 2013 4:00 PM

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Elderly and young physically disabled patients are benefitting from a newly created outdoor space at the Langlands Unit on the Southern General campus.

Funding donated from the Royal Voluntary Society (RVS) was invested in creating an outdoor space for patients to enjoy. The space was designed to be especially beneficial for patients with dementia to help stimulate old memories and create new memories, with an area replicating an old fashioned “back close” with grass, traditional drying green and old park bench.

There is also a 'raised bed' area allowing patients to plant flowers without having to bend down which can be accessed by patient in wheelchairs, a shed, which is also wheelchair accessible, to allow patients to go in and rummage amongst old garden tools, a pitch and putt area and a wooden pergola with seating underneath to provide shade from the sun, wind and rain.
The new garden was officially opened by Alex McIntyre, Director of Facilities, who welcomed patients, staff and relatives to the official opening. He said: “It is a pleasure to open this facility and it is heartening to see some of our underused space being put to such good use.

“The range of activities on offer within this sensory garden will help to enhance our patients’ quality of life. Relatives and visitors will also be able to accompany their loved ones in the garden and enjoy the outdoor setting.

“We would like to thank the RVS for their kind donation of £25,000 and for the hard work of gardener Tony McCaffrey who researched sensory gardens and then constructed this one.

“We now also hope to use this innovative design in other care of the elderly facilities throughout NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde.”

Geraldine Marsh, Lead Nurse, Langlands Unit added: “We wanted to create a garden that patients can use 12 months of the year as it is quite sheltered and what has been created is brilliant.

“There is good evidence that by involving patients in activities both physical and mental their rehabilitation is improved. The sensory garden will make a big difference to the patients. The area can also be accessed by patients’ relatives and friends and is somewhere for them to spent time outwith the clinical setting of the ward creating a more person centred environment.”

ENDS


For more information either telephone 0141 201 4429 or email [email protected] .

Pic:  Alex McIntyre, Director of Facilities (right) cuts the ribbon officially opening the new Sensory Garden with Marie Farrell, Interim Director of Rehabilitation and Assessment (middle), and Tony McCaffrey, Macdeck Ltd (left) who worked on the project.

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